Design/Ceramics

JHMorales throwing a bowl of stoneware

I have been working in handmade ceramics for more than 35 years. I learned at the beginning of my design studies with the Colombian ceramics master Mr. Pablo Jaramillo. Always, one way or another, I have been working, researching and experimenting in the potter's job. From the industrial aspect, in large companies of porcelain sanitary and household ware, to the most manual craft of the wheel and formulation of the glazes, both in low and high temperature.

I lived 5 years in Beijing, R.P.Ch. There I studied one year of Chinese language and one year of ceramic techniques, mainly porcelain. In Spain I am still researching ceramic techniques and new glaze formulas.

The creative work in ceramics is based on knowledge and long experience. Never stop experimenting and be aware of what you can discover. The ceramics job involves a lot of physical effort due to the weight of the materials and the handling of the clays. You have to wedge, wheelthrown, trimming-sanding-finnishing, glaze, fire in the kiln.

The pieces are very delicate in all the processes of their elaboration, so you have to treat them very carefully. When they are freshly made on the wheel they can deform. While they dry they can break very easily. After the first firing (1000ºC or 1830ºF in stoneware and 1100ºC or 2010ºF in porcelain) they remain fragile due to their thinness and low hardness. After glazing, they are barely covered by powdered minerals dissolved in water that will become glass when the piece is fired at the final temperature (1250ºC or 2280ºF).

At the end of the process the clay has vitrified and the glaze has melted by adhering to the piece and developing its own surface and characteristic color. The result can only be observed when the kiln is opened after a day of cooling. Usually, if everything has been done well, it is always rewarding. Although sometimes there are surprises, some good and sometimes not so much.

A little history

I am Jorge H Morales, Industrial Designer since 1985 by the Pontifician Bolivarianan University of Medellín, Colombia.

During the faculty studies I kept constant contact with ceramics in the studio that Master Pablo Jaramillo had in the faculty building. I also attended instruction in the ceramics studio of the artist José Ignacio Velez Puerta.

At the end of the degree I attended a 4-month training, in industrial ceramic processes in the companies of the Corona group, in the sanitary ware factory of Caldas, Antioquia, and in the tableware factory of Vajillas Corona.

Potter and owner of the Tierra Cocida Cerámica Pottery from 1987 to 1990 in Medellín, Colombia.

For my innovative work I was awarded the Advanced Studies in Ceramic Design Scholarship that I assisted at the Institute of Art and Design of China in Beijing, R.P.China (1990-92). At that time, it was the institution where future Chinese and foreign ceramic teachers were prepared. This is today the Academy of Art & Design, Tsinghua University 清华大学 美术 学院.

In 1994 I attended the course of High temperature firing techniques with Manuel Keller at the Ingenieria2000 kilns factory.

From 1995 to 2003 I was a potter and owner of the JHMorales Handmade Pottery, in Alicante, Spain.

I have had temporary jobs in web design and social assistance for German retirees in the province of Alicante.

I currently work in my JHMorales.ceramics Pottery, in Alicante, Spain.

Return of the travel to Jingdezhen in the Advanced studies of ceramic design course in China

Gallery

See what's happening

I am often publishing part of what I am preparing in my Instagram account @jhmorales.ceramics, which is reflected in the Facebook account jhmorales.ceramic. I also publish from moments that inspire me, ways to make my products, results of color tests, etc., to the finished pieces that I have uploaded to the store.

When you click on the image you can see the photo gallery in high resolution.

Pieces

Album of images in high resolution in JHMorales Photos, opens in a new window

Inspiration

Album of images in high resolution in JHMorales Photos, opens in a new window